About

I am an inter-disciplinary researcher with interests that lie at the intersection of Computer science, Physics and Medicine.

I am currently appointed as a Postdoctoral fellow at the UBC Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, where I develop novel machine-learning based PET/MRI image analysis techniques.

My main place of work is at the Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health and Pacific Parkinson’s Research Centre.

Over the past decade, my research and interests have shifted from fundamental biological physics to applied technology in healthcare, including computer vision and machine learning -enabled applications. My CV is available here (pdf).

My past notable projects include:

  • Our study of the effect of exercise on dopamine release in the brain of Parkinson’s disease patients was selected as a “hot topic” at the 2016 Neuroscience Meeting in San Diego (Sacheli et al., “Aerobic exercise can induce dopamine release in Parkinson’s disease: [11C]Raclopride PET study”). The study used state-of-the-art image analysis techniques that were developed by our imaging group at UBC. More info about this study can be found in this UBC press release, as well as in Richmond News. Also, take a look at this relevant article in The Globe and Mail.

  • In the early days of MetaOptima Technology, together with Dr. Maryam Sadeghi and Prof. Stella Atkins we developed an image analysis engine to detect skin cancer, and a framework for visualization and mapping of skin moles in 3D on a smartphone. The analysis engine and the bodymap are available commercially as part of the Molescope and DermEngine products, which are considered to be one of the best in the field. This work was featured in many news outlets, for example in Popular Science, Vancouver Sun, Yahoo News.

  • At the University of Washington, my colleagues and I developed a new technology to purify water from micrometer-sized particulates, such as bacteria and topsoil particles (I. Klyuzhin et al, “New Method of Water Purification Based on the Particle-Exclusion Phenomenon”). The advantage of our technology was that it required very little energy to run, compared to the traditional filter-based methods. This project was brought to prominence by a news article in New Scientist, and picked up by several other news feeds around the world.

  • Our work on the water non-coalescence phenomenon at the University of Washington (I. Klyuzhin et al., “Persisting Water Droplets on Water Surfaces”) was featured in a Smarter Every Day video.